Because we’d like to meet new people, connect, inspire, and be inspired at the same time. Because we aim to continuously promote working hard and exploring even harder. Because we aim to give credits to those who keep a regular job and still travel.

The Corporate Nomads is conducting a series that will feature other Corporate Nomads out there.

And now, The Corporate Nomads SPOTLIGHT is on Ms. Shekinah Angiwan.

TCN Spotlight Is On Shekinah Angiwan of A Wandering Cat

Goes by the nickname, Kai, she’s someone who have been bitten by the travel bug, keeping a regular full time job, and yet finds time and makes way for traveling.

Kai is a licensed teacher by profession working as Content Specialist for Trend Micro, an online security company. She is the writer and owner of A Wandering Cat, a travel blog dedicated to adventure-seekers on a budget looking for local and international DIY vacation itineraries, reasonably-priced dining establishments, exciting activities, and affordable accommodation. She is a self-confessed cat-lover, tree-hugger, bookworm, workaholic, lagalag, and a mountaineer. She has a BA in Communication, major in Speech Communication and minor in Journalism, from UP Baguio. She is currently taking her MA in Creative Writing at UP Diliman.

So, below are a handful of inspiration and getting to know more about Kai:

  1. Are you a tourist or a traveler? Why?

I am both a tourist and a traveler. I often travel, and when I do, it’s for leisure and learning. I plan my trips like a tourist, which means I go to recommended tourist spots, but I also consider myself a responsible traveler, which means I respect the people and the places I visit. I enjoy going on packaged tours, but I love it when I occasionally find myself in unexpected situations and sites.

2. When did you start traveling? What got you motivated to travel?

I’ve always had an insatiable desire to go places, but I think the first time I realized that I love to travel was when I was working for Cordillera Conservation Trust, an environmental NGO. Through this organization, I got to visit remote places, such as Kabayan, Benguet, to plant tree seedlings. Afterwards, I joined the UP Baguio Mountaineers and was elected president. Climbing mountains like Mt. Pulag, Mt. Ugo, and Mt. Amuyao further fuelled my wanderlust, which motivated me to visit more places. And pretty soon, I started writing about my travels.

A photo that reminds Kai of her first travel. "My first touristy travel was when I went to Palawan as a graduation gift from my parents. This is a very memorable photo because it’s the first time I went snorkelling in waters that clear. Up to this point, I still think the beaches in Puerto Princesa are the best," said Kai.

A photo that reminds Kai of her first travel.
“My first touristy travel was when I went to Palawan as a graduation gift from my parents. This is a very memorable photo because it’s the first time I went snorkelling in waters that clear. Up to this point, I still think the beaches in Puerto Princesa are the best,” said Kai.

3. What do you love about traveling that keeps you yearning for more?

The best thing about traveling, for me, is that I get to learn so much about different places, including where I’m from, and I encounter different kinds of people. I think the unique experiences from traveling are an important part of self-development because being a lakwatsera has made me more open-minded. I think this quotation from Clint Borgen sums up my thoughts nicely: “When overseas, you learn more about your own country than you do the place you’re visiting.” You learn a lot about yourself and the people you travel with as well.

4. How do you keep a balance between work and travel?

I’m lucky that my manager and the company I currently work for value the well-being of their employees, so taking time off from work is not an issue. For me, it’s more a question of balancing my travel budget and my daily budget. I try not to schedule travels one after another in rapid succession, but rather space them out. For example, it’s enough to have one or two major travels a year that are two to three months apart. And in between, I can do minor travels, such as going somewhere local, trying new restaurant, etc.

5. Would you quit your job to travel full time? Why? Why not?

I would not quit my job to travel full-time because I like working for Trend Micro. It keeps me grounded and gives me some semblance of stability.

6. Do you ever see yourself becoming a digital nomad? Is it worth it to try? Is it going to be sustainable in the long run?

I think I would try it for a few months or a year. The experience would definitely be worth it, but it would depend on the person if this kind of lifestyle would be sustainable or not. I’ve a lot of experience working online and I get easily bored, so the life of a digital nomad may not be for me.

7. What is your take on being a digital nomad?

I respect and admire those who are able to pull this off. It takes a lot of guts and determination to rely purely on technology for work. Aside from that, having that much freedom to do as you please makes me a bit envious.

8. If you are a place you’ve already been to, what place would you be and why?

If I were a place, I would be Hong Kong – sometimes noisy, sometimes peaceful. I like to be organized, but I can be spontaneous as well. Aside from that, I have a few surprises up my sleeve.

Kai: At Hong Kong Ocean Park, there is a section that was made to simulate old Hong Kong. We had just gotten off the cable cars, so we were a bit shaken. Then as we turned a corner, we were delighted to find ourselves in old Hong Kong. We spent quite some time taking photos there.

Kai: At Hong Kong Ocean Park, there is a section that was made to simulate old Hong Kong. We had just gotten off the cable cars, so we were a bit shaken. Then as we turned a corner, we were delighted to find ourselves in old Hong Kong. We spent quite some time taking photos there.

9. If you are asked to travel at once, all-expenses paid, and the sky is the limit, wherever, where would you go and why?

I would go to Japan. I haven’t been to Japan, but I am fascinated by her culture and her people. I would explore it from north to south and I’m sure I will love it, quirks and everything.

10. What can you say to other Corporate Nomads out there? Or those that keep a regular 9 to 5 job, but still find the time to travel?

To them, I say, keep doing what you’re doing as long as you aren’t neglecting any responsibilities, relationships, and/or personal necessities.

11. What are three things that you learned from traveling?

Three things I learned from traveling:

  1. Don’t spend your money all in one place.
  2. Invest in a good, sturdy camera.
  3. Every experience, even if it’s in the same place, is unique. So be in the moment.

12. What would you say to your traveler self 10 years from now?

I would say, “Well done.”

13. Why is traveling important to you?

As I said, traveling is important to me because it helps me be a better person. Another reason is that traveling with my family, friends, and significant other has brought us closer together in so many ways.

There you have it. A glimpse of the woman behind A Wandering Cat. Indeed, every answer was a total inspiration, right?

Follow and get to know more about Kai through facebook and instagram.

Comments

comments

Toni has always been an adventure seeker, always up to experience new things. She is a proud Davaoeña who lives for the moment, capturing episodes of bliss. She keeps a 9-5PM job in a reputable bank on a Monday through Fridays and her foot soles just itch in between. She's someone who has a very strong desire to travel, but she is no big traveler herself as she always says. She does her ‘kindergarten adventures’, as she calls, to break the monotony of working in a one-sitting-cubicle type of job. Saturdays and Sundays are too sacred for her. She'd prefer outdoor adventures hiking up mountains or diving into the deepest sea. Wandering helps her keep going and say her “Hello, Monday!” mantra lively.

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